Wedding traditions in Mongolia, customs, rituals, costumes, and more

The traditions of Asian Weddings are one of the most rooted in beliefs and religions, as they have been celebrated for thousands of years with the birth of their culture, adding details of the new time, while retaining the most important in its history.

There is a set of folkloric and indigenous elements that we only find in wedding traditions in Mongolia, a country in East Asia that still continues to carry out ceremonies with ancient acts inherited from its ancestors.

Wedding Traditions In Mongolia

The Matchmaker

Although this is an ancient tradition, there are some Mongolian tribes that continue to carry out the intervention of a matchmaker, which will be in charge of analyzing possible women who are compatible with a man, since the recruitment comes from the man’s family.

From the age of 8, some families start looking for a wife for their male children so that in the future they can get married. If the matchmaker convinces the family of the prospective bride, then the man and his family go directly to ask for her hand at the correct age.

The Bride Must Be Difficult To Conquer

wedding traditions, customs, rituals

For Mongols, a woman’s acceptance or “yes” is much more valuable if she is slow to give an answer or repeatedly rejects it. This act symbolizes spiritual purity and family honor for the intended, as well as the mettle of the suitor.

If, on the contrary, the future boyfriend gets the yes from his parents or from the girlfriend herself during the first two attempts, then it could be considered as an act of contempt for the man, since it would mean that the woman is not worthy enough to conquer it.

A Ballad Of Love

Another of the great wedding traditions in Mongolia is the classic ballad of love, a local chant that is recited by the groom after the girl’s family accepts him as a suitor and future husband, taking with him some family present

That is why the groom offers some alcoholic beverages for the girl’s father, butter for the mother to prepare delicious dishes and sweets for the bride, as a special present. Some stories say that they also had fairies since the lyrics of the ballad say so.

The Wedding Date

As we commonly see in Asian weddings, the wedding date has a symbolic and determining character for the future of the bride and groom, according to their own superstitions. Therefore, it was preferable that significant days were chosen for the beliefs and religions of the Mongols.

The groom’s family goes to a Lama so that he can select the most appropriate date for the event since he has knowledge about local celebrations and about the days when he can have more luck and fortune. If the couple chose a negative date, their marriage would be the same.

Perpetual Commitment

If the commitment is made during the childhood of the future spouses, the groom acquires a perpetual and unchangeable responsibility with the bride’s family, which consists of visiting her during all the important dates and celebrations carried out by them.

If you do not come for any reason, the marriage could be reconsidered, since promises and commitments are of the utmost importance to the culture. In turn, the boy must bring a present to keep his future wife attentive.

Nine Gifts

For the Mongols, the number nine represents fertility, longevity, and happiness. That is why the groom’s family must bring 9 gifts and presents to the bride’s family, thus representing the royal commitment and luck or fortune for the marriage.

In the case of the engaged, he has to grant four additional gifts for the bride, which are 4 dresses for the 4 seasons of the year, with representative colors and ornaments. Gifts range from cows, camels, and, to a lesser extent, horses. All white.

The Suit Of The Bride And Groom

Unlike other cultures, in Mongolia the bride and groom wear practically the same suit since it is part of the indigenous clothing that they have used since the beginning of their culture, only differing by color and by some details and accessories.

This costume is called Deel, and it is a classic and traditional dress that Mongols wear at the time of marriage. This can be inherited from their parents, although they can also be designed by themselves to give the couple more luck.

A Song To Find The Bride

On the wedding day, it is the groom who looks for his fiancée to his parents’ house, riding a horse or a camel, and dressed in his wedding suit ready for the occasion. Upon arrival, he will meet the bride’s relatives forming a barrier at the door of the house.

At that moment, the groom must recite through a local chant, the reasons why he is going to look for his fiancée. If those on the barrier respond with rejection tunes, the suitor has to continue singing until he opens up and can pick up his future wife.

Camel Carriage

We have all seen the traditional carriages that take the bride and groom to church in Western cultures, but in Mongolia, they use camels, usually a couple of them and raised by the family so that “the load” is completely familiar.

In addition, there are times when the groom goes on one of the camels and the bride in the carriage, as an act that symbolizes the leadership and the role of responsibility that the man will have in the future marriage. If the family comes from far away, they try to leave in time to meet on the road.

The Red Veil

The bride’s dress has a peculiarity, and it is that her veil is not white but red, a wedding tradition that we only find in Mongolia. This is combined with a peach-colored tunic or cape to finish giving the final touch to the outfit.

The bride is dressed by her neighbors and the women of her locality, who are in charge of making all the necessary arrangements to make her presentable, just as tradition dictates. Also, they sometimes wear an accessory inherited from an ancestor for good luck.

Cheese And Lamb Banquet

The typical national dishes cannot be absent in a Mongolian wedding celebration, so their most favorite foods are national cheese and lamb. The family and those closest to them celebrate the wedding by tasting the most delicious dishes, prepared by themselves.

To the sound of the music and folk tunes of the region, traditional dances come together to celebrate a feast in style. Of course, the bride and groom always have to be together, since from that moment they have become an inseparable couple for life.

Three Laps About The Store

There are nomadic Mongols who live in special tents. In that case, the bride must get on a horse after having married, and give it three laps around what was her house, as an act of detachment and farewell to what was her home during her life.

After that, the groom takes control of the horse and they gallop together to their new home.

You may also be interested in Some types of marriage in Central Asia

Benefits of preserving culture

In recent years there has been a lot of talk about the urgency and importance of preserving our culture. Pollution and careless exploitation are certainly undermining the ecosystems’ chances of natural recovery. However, globalization has brought strong cultural pressures that threaten to eradicate ancient cultures, customs, and traditions.

Benefits of preserving culture

Those cultures are as important and valuable as our environment. The different ways human beings have established relationships with the natural and social environment require our attention and are worthy of being cared for and preserved.

Ensure a better understanding

The cultural, patrimonial, and historical heritage that we have allows us to understand ourselves better. But it is not just a matter of privileging the indigenous and rejecting the foreign. Understanding and enjoying our historical and cultural baggage will also allow us to better adapt to foreign cultural influences, making them enrich us instead of simply copying them without adding value.

Present the activities

Culture includes how we express ourselves, language, and the way we see and respond to things, our myths and beliefs, our knowledge about our natural and social environment, our gastronomy, tastes, and customs. Giving up would leave us orphans of identity and we would lose an important part of our value as individuals.

More than protecting our cultural characteristics, the idea is to reinforce and enhance them, to make them stronger in the face of external factors. This, again, does not mean that we should renounce different cultural influences, for we can do so without losing the essence of our culture.

In short, just as it is important to preserve our tangible cultural heritage, it is equally important to preserve and promote our intangible cultural heritage. This will allow us to understand where we are in the world, where we are, and how we can enriching world culture and economy in the age of globalization.

Where does the importance lie of identity?

The identity of a people lies in its Cultural Heritage. It is the set of tangible and intangible goods, which constitute the heritage of a human group, which emotionally reinforces its sense of community with its mark and perceived by others as exclusive (built, artistic, tangible or intangible, natural or natural works). Urban). It is the expression that the sister accompanies through time, shaping “her” story. Unique and unrepeatable.

Preservation means guarding and caring for something to preserve its condition and prevent it from losing its value, preventing its deterioration. To preserve is to protect and defend this set of movable and immovable property, tangible and intangible, in possession of individuals or public institutions. It has exceptional value from the point of view of history, art, science, and culture. It is said of goods worthy of being treasured to understand the past and the present of the local history.

The heritage of a people is reflected in its architecture and artistic-cultural expressions, and it is its most precious treasure: it is the memory of its customs. It is consciousness and identity as a unique society that shares a past with the landscape related to the present. Cultural Heritage is part of the landscape. It is produced by the actions of man in its integral aspect. It is testimony to all the cultures that have historically developed on a natural site or landscape, forming a tangible cultural idiosyncrasy in the natural environment surrounding it.

It is not possible to adequately read the cultural, historical past of people without understanding the nature that surrounds it. For this reason, the preservation of the elements that identify people cannot do without the natural environment on which it sits. Nature is vitally important in preserving the heritage and must play a very important role for each inhabitant since ecosystems are preserved and quality of life.

It is not to stop the process of transformation of the city or a site, but to guide it, finding a balance that considers the real needs and expectations of the moment and the population.

Providing high-value services

It makes their conservation of vital importance. Because of their high level of biomass, tropical forests help regulate the global climate. Reduce the greenhouse effect by storing millions of tons of carbon in plant tissues and the soil, prevent soil erosion, and protect micro-watersheds that provide clean water to thousands of people. If a monetary value were placed on these seemingly free services, it would be in the many billions of dollars each year.

A reward for ecosystem goods

Tropical forests also provide goods, such as wood, fibers, resins, animal and plant products; thousands of edible species of which only a fraction enter world trade: biological and genetic resources and medicines. Less than 1% of the plants in the world’s tropical forests have been studied for their pharmaceutical properties. However, at least 25% of all modern drugs have an active ingredient derived from plants.